The earlier sections of the Enquiry were devoted very largely to the task of showing that usefulness

The earlier sections of the Enquiry were devoted very largely to the task of showing that usefulness

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Unformatted text preview: The earlier sections of the Enquiry were devoted very largely to the task of showing that usefulness to ourselves and to others is the source of all moral sentiments. It now remains to see whether this explanation is sufficient to account for all of those qualities of conduct which are approved and disapproved by people in general. This appears to be necessary because any adequate system of moral philosophy must explain the origin of moral sentiments and must be able to account for all types of behavior which are recognized as morally good or evil. Hume begins in this section by examining a number of those qualities which are useful to ourselves. These include such items as discretion, industry, honesty, truthfulness, chastity, bodily endowments, and material goods. The list is not intended to be an exhaustive one, but it is sufficient to illustrate...
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The earlier sections of the Enquiry were devoted very largely to the task of showing that usefulness

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