Hagg_Retention_Theory_Timeline.pptx - RETENTION THEORY...

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RETENTION THEORY TIMELINERETENTION THEORY TIMELINEAMANDA HAGGLIBERTY UNIVERSITYAMANDA HAGGLIBERTY UNIVERSITY
STUDENT retention in the higher educational setting can be defined by countless factors. Throughout history, many theories have been developed in relation to the process of student retention in an attempt to examine and identify these components. These theories have become key influences of practice in retention education of our college and university system as we know it to be today.THIS presentation will explore ten of the crucial theories that have shaped student retention in the past, present, and future.
1938 - College Student MortalityJOHN H. MCNEELY1938 - College Student MortalityJOHN H. MCNEELYMcNeely (1938) conducted a study, which was then published by the United States Department of the Interior and the Office of Education, in which he sought to analyze college student mortality, or failure of undergraduate students to remain in school until graduation. Data from sixty institutions was gathered and examines, looking closely at demographic characteristics, social involvement, and the student’s stated reason for departure.Although the priority of attaining higher education was set aside during the first world war and the great depression, McNeely set the bar for further research into the subject of student retention, as his initial study would become a pioneer study for further research into this matter. (Berger & Lyon, 2005)
1962 - Challenge & Support TheoryNEVITT SANFORD1962 - Challenge & Support TheoryNEVITT SANFORDSanford suggested that for significant growth and development to occur, college students must be provided with an equal amount of support and challenge. He also discussed how the campus environment interacts with individual students in regard to people, policies, and programs to either foster development or interfere with it. (Schuh et al., 2017) In the 1960’s, universities were facing new problems as society became prosperous. Colleges and universities competed to recruit students and obtain funds in the form of research grants, donors, and external monies. This led to the creation of the “multiversity”, which utilized federal grant money for new graduate programs and institutes of research. (Schuh et al., 2017) Regardless, of the size, theorists suggested that the campus environment had a strategical impact on student retention.
1962 - Personality-Based Retention TheoryJOHN SUMMERSKILL1962 - Personality-Based Retention TheoryJOHN SUMMERSKILLSummerskill (1962) theorized that a student’s decision to leave an institution can be influenced by their own personality and characteristics such as their disposition, maturity, and motivation.

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