fa04_lex11fwd

fa04_lex11fwd - 1.221J/11.527J/ESD.201J Transportation...

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1.221J/11.527J/ESD.201J Transportation Systems Fall 2004 LECTURE 11 (and forward) : TRAVELER TRANSPORTATION DISPLAYS SPEAKER: Joseph M. Sussman MIT
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Traveler Transportation Outline ± Differences between Traveler and Freight Transportation ± A Brief History of Metropolitan Areas ± Some Transportation History ± Automobile Transportation ± Urban Public Transportation ± Intercity Traveler Transportation ± Air Transportation ± Rail Transportation ± Mexico City ± Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) 2
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Differences between Traveler and Freight Transportation ± The Transportation Process ± Safety and Security ± Level-of-Service Variables ± Groups ± Motivation for Travel ± Travel as Discretionary ± Success in the Marketplace CLASS DISCUSSION 3
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Substitutability of Communications and Transportation ± Two opposing perspectives: ± Communications will greatly reduce the need for transportation because of the telecommuting option; people will not have to actually physically be at the office to make a contribution. ± On the other hand, while telecommuting may occur, the economic interactions that will occur as a result of enhanced communication may generate more travel than is saved by the telecommuting option. 4
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Core and Garden Cities (after Lay) Rail Spokes Core City “Garden” Cities at human scale Figure 21.2 5
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The U.S. Model “Infill” between the “Spokes” (after Lay) Rail Spokes Core City “Infill” Figure 21.3 6
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Other Urban Questions ± Suburbanization ± Mega-Cities ± Ring-Roads ± “Edge Cities” 7
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Land Use and Public Transportation ± You cannot separate transportation policy from the way in which land is used: for residences, for shopping, for jobs. Land use and transportation are hand-in-glove. ± Low-density development patterns make providing public transportation services extremely difficult. ± Experts from the fields of urban policy, real estate development, regional economics, municipal finance, landscape ecology, transportation, urban air quality, public health and civil engineering are needed. 8
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The T-Shaped “New Transportation Professional” Breadth in: Transportation Fundamentals In-depth knowledge - technology within a - systems transportation - institutions specialty Sussman, Joseph M., “Educating the ‘New Transportation Professional’”, ITS Quarterly , Summer 1995. Figure 21.4 9
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MOBILITY VS. ACCESSIBILITY Mobility – The ability to move people and freight freely Accessibility – The ability to reach attractive destinations 10
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