trans_sys_chap04

trans_sys_chap04 - Introduction to Transportation Systems 1...

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Introduction to Transportation Systems 1
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PART I: CONTEXT, CONCEPTS AND CHARACTERIZATION 2
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Chapter 4: The Customer and Level-of-Service 3
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The Customer u The customers of the transportation system, be it the air passenger or the coal executive who is deciding which railroad to use to service his transportation needs, is fundamental to the transportation enterprise. u Thinking about what is important to the customer, from the perspective of what services transportation organizations provide, is fundamental. 4
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The Customer u Hamel and Prahalad, in “Competing for the Future”, define the market opportunity as fundamental to the transportation enterprise. u Drucker talks about all results being external to the organization, and the purpose of the business being the creation of customers. 5
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Two Kinds of Transportation Customers u Freight Transportation Customers u Traveler Transportation Customers 6
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Supply Chain Management The transportation provider -- the railroad, for example -- becomes an integral part of the customer’s logistics system, providing reliable delivery and pick-up of goods as they progress through the supply chain. 7
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Different Kinds of Freight Requiring Different Levels-of-Service u High-value manufactured goods . . . . . . u Bulk commodities (e.g., coal, agricultural products) 8
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Level-of-Service Variables for Freight F PRICE F TRAVEL TIME F SERVICE RELIABILITY F AVAILABILITY OF SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT F PROBABILITY OF LOSS AND DAMAGE 9
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This note was uploaded on 12/06/2011 for the course ESD 1.221j taught by Professor Josephsussman during the Fall '04 term at MIT.

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trans_sys_chap04 - Introduction to Transportation Systems 1...

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