trans_sys_chap08

trans_sys_chap08 - Introduction to Transportation Systems 1...

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Introduction to Transportation Systems 1
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PART I: CONTEXT, CONCEPTS AND CHARACTERIZATION 2
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Chapter 8: Transportation Systems: Key Points 18-24 3
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Our Next Concept -- Peaking Volume vs. Time of Day VOLU ME ARRIVING PACKAGE AT WORK RETURN FROM LUNCH PEAK PICK - UP 7 AM N OON 4 PM TIME OF DAY UP DIRECTION VOLUME GOIN G TO LUNCH PEAK LEAVING WORK 7 AM N OO N 4 PM TIME O F DAY DOWN D IRE CTION 4 Figure 8.1
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How much capacity should we provide? Different Capacity Decisions VOLUME CAPACITY 1 CAPACITY CAPACITY = AVERAGE DEMAND TIME OF DAY So what do we do? We cannot choose such a low capacity that customer levels-of-service during peak periods are unacceptable. At the same time, however, we cannot provide a level-of-service such that nobody ever has to wait -- it’s not economical. So, capacity 3 may be a good compromise. The question of design capacity and how we accommodate temporal peaks in demand is Key Point 18. 5 Figure 8.2
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Key Point 18: Peaking Temporal peaking in demand: a fundamental issue is design capacity -- how often do we not satisfy demand? 6
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Our Next Concept ± The volume that a transportation service attracts is a function of the level-of- service provided to customers. If the level-of-service deteriorates, less people will want to use the service. ± This is simply a micro-economic concept. For example, if a movie theater doubles its price, therefore making its service less attractive -- in this case, more expensive -- fewer people will go to that movie theater. If a movie theater halves its price, more people will go. 7
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Key Point 19: Volume = ƒ (level-of-service); Transportation Demand Transportation Demand: LOS vs. Volume LOS DEMAN D VOLUME Figure 8.3 8
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Level-of-Service Is Multi- Dimensional ± We simply cannot measure LOS by a single variable -- like travel time. Rather,
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trans_sys_chap08 - Introduction to Transportation Systems 1...

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