At work - At work, Lou Epstein, the oldest of the brothers,...

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Unformatted text preview: At work, Lou Epstein, the oldest of the brothers, speaks privately with Alfred about the burglary. He says that Alfred is "a good boy," but the employers seem distant and distrustful. Jake, the middle brother, takes the deposit to the bank; this had been Alfred's job. Surprisingly, James, his face swollen and grim, appears at the window as Alfred is arranging fruit in the front window. He doesn't respond to Alfred's greeting. Alfred is despondent and fantasizes about robbing the store himself. Suddenly Henry pops in, oozing energy. He is delighted that Alfred will be at the gym after work. Before Alfred can refuse, Henry is gone. Alfred's hold on his new life is tenuous. He wavers between hope and despair. In this chapter, we see a young man at a crossroads in life, and he is struggling to determine which path to take. One continuing problem for Alfred is that he can be excessively influenced by those around him. (This will continuing problem for Alfred is that he can be excessively influenced by those around him....
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This note was uploaded on 12/06/2011 for the course ENG 3320 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '09 term at University of Houston.

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