Lab_04_2011 - GG303 Lab 4 9/14/11 1 INTERSECTIONS OF PLANES...

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GG303 Lab 4 9/14/11 1 Stephen Martel Lab4-1 University of Hawaii INTERSECTIONS OF PLANES Lab 4 Read each exercise completely before you start it so that you understand the problem-solving approach you are asked to execute. This will help keep the big picture clear. Exercise 1: Apparent dip (57 points total) Graphical and trigonometric solutions 1) For plane ABC (Plane 1) on the next page, graphically determine its strike and dip. Then find the apparent dip of plane ABC as seen in vertical cross section plane P2, which strikes 300° . Check the apparent dip you obtain graphically against the apparent dip you obtain trigonometrically using the expression in the course notes. Enter your results in the table. Show your trigonometric calculations in the box below the table. (12 points total) Table Strike of ABC (graphical) (3pts) True dip of ABC (graphical) (3 pts) Apparent dip of ABC (Graphical) (3 pts) Apparent dip of ABC (Trig.) (3 pts) Box for calculations . .
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GG303 Lab 4 9/14/11 2 Stephen Martel Lab4-2 University of Hawaii
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GG303 Lab 4 9/14/11 3 Stephen Martel Lab4-3 University of Hawaii Solution from cross-products of poles You will now find the orientation of the line of intersection between plane ABC and the cross section plane from the cross product of the poles to the planes using two different techniques (see page 2). These solutions are to be done on Matlab. One-line Matlab commands can address each question. Include a printout of your work showing your answers. Annotate the printout as you see fit. Poles from strike and dip 2) From the strike and dip of cross section plane P2 find the trend and plunge of its pole, first in degrees, and then in radians. The trend and plunge, measured in radians, are the two angular coordinates in a spherical reference frame; the third spherical coordinate, the distance from the origin, has a value of 1 for a unit length vector. Then use the Matlab function sph2cart to find the direction cosines (Cartesian coordinates of a pole of unit length) from the spherical coordinates of the pole. (18 points total; 1 point per box) Plane ABC (plane P1) Strike(°) Dip(°) Pole n1 trend (°) Pole n1 plunge (°) Pole trend (radians) Pole plunge (radians) α 1 β 1 γ 1 Plane P2 Strike(°) Dip(°) Pole n2 trend (°) Pole n2 plunge (°) Pole trend (radians) Pole plunge (radians) α 2 β 2 γ 2 Check on your results: Poles directly from coordinates of points in plane (just for plane ABC) 3) Find the x,y,z coordinates of points A, B, and C as shown in the orthographic projection on p/ 2. Give the coordinates to the nearest 0.1 units. NOTE THAT POSITIVE Z POINTS DOWN, so the z-values in the attached figure for the front view have increasingly positive values with distance below the top plane. (9 points total; 1 point/box) x y z Point A Point B Point C
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course GEOLOGY 300 taught by Professor Stephenmartel during the Fall '11 term at University of Hawaii, Manoa.

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Lab_04_2011 - GG303 Lab 4 9/14/11 1 INTERSECTIONS OF PLANES...

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