Section_2.3_Lecture

Section_2.3_Lecture - Section 2.3 Development Theories from...

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Section 2.3 Development Theories from a Global Perspective Section Readings: McMahon 2001: “ Technology and Globalization: An Overview So 1990: Summary Chase-Dunn 2005: “ Dependency and World-Systems Theories Shannon 1996: “ World-System Structure”
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Section Overview In previous sections, we explored the origins and  development of global inequality.  For this section we will  explore mechanisms that maintain global inequality and the  role that technology plays in them There are three main development theories that we will  discuss in this section, each of which has a unique  perspective on global inequality 1) Modernization theory 2) Dependency theory 3) World-systems theory
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Globalization Globalization   refers to a world increasingly linked under the rule of  capitalist economics and politics, in which international borders are  diminished in importance and a worldwide marketplace is created The integration of national economies into the international economy through  trade, foreign direct investment, capital flows, migration, and the spread of  technology Advances in communication and transport technology play a key  role in globalization and have been doing so for quite some time There are also cultural components to globalization, as increased  contact between societies increases cultural diffusion and leads to  societies become more similar
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McMahon 2001 “Technology and Globalization” In this article, McMahon focuses on the role that technology has  played in processes of globalization “Technology is the physical and organizational enabler of  globalization” Communications and transportation technologies made  globalization possible (beginning in the mid-15 th  century) Some contend it began with the first trade links nearly 5000 years ago Early technological innovations were driven by national military  concerns, but recent globalization processes are more the work of  private, commercial interests Military production used to be the leading economic industrial sector
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Technology and Globalization Discusses how technological advances radically influenced the  reach and strength of globalization Industrialization resulted in a new phase of virulent nationalism,  imperialism, and militarism Echoes some of Nolan and Lenski from section 2.2 Computing and telecommunications capacity made global  commercial operations possible How does McMahon account for the US’s rise to power?
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The context of modernization theory
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The North-South Divide
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Modernization Theory Post-World War II era – disintegration of European colonial  empires and birth of new nation-states in the Third World
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course ANT 261 taught by Professor Jicha during the Fall '08 term at N.C. State.

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Section_2.3_Lecture - Section 2.3 Development Theories from...

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