Acne vulgaris Symptom1

Acne vulgaris - sebum which is unable to escape The sebum becomes infected by bacteria which break down it down into fatty acids which in turn

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Acne vulgaris Symptoms Acne Vulgaris typically occurs during puberty and resolves by the mid twenties. More aggressive forms may continue to affect patients up to the age of forty; this is especially in women who have premenstrual flare-ups. Characteristic signs of an Acne outbreak include: Seborrhoea – excessive production of sebum (a fatty secretion that lubricates hair and skin), leading to increased greasiness of the skin Comedomes – tiny nodules on the skin which first appear as whiteheads but later develop into blackheads Papules (Erythematous spots) – appear after blackhead rupture Scaring – a result of picking and squeezing the papules Skin Lesions – highly inflamed pustules which contain pus Cysts – may arise from pustules after they rupture, found in Cystic Acne Distribution o Face and Neck (99%) o Back (60%) o Chest (15%) Causes Acne develops as a result of blocked follicles. Overactive sebaceous glands produce large amounts of
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Unformatted text preview: sebum which is unable to escape. The sebum becomes infected by bacteria which break down it down into fatty acids which in turn irritate the skin. Factors which contribute to the development of Acne include: • Hormonal activity and increased Androgen levels • Diet – high Glycaemic load and Cow’s milk have been associated • Cosmetics, skin preparations and shampoos • Medications such as bromides, steroids, androgenic hormones and oral contraceptives Epidemiology Acne Vulgaris typically appears around puberty. Peak incidence is 14-17 in girls and 16-19 in boys. At the age of 16 estimates report that Acne affects 95% of boys and 80% of girls to some extent. Diagnosis Diagnosis is based on the patient’s clinical picture. Important differentials include Rosacea, Keratosis pilaris and Chloracne. Cultures may identify Propionibacterium acnes , an anaerobic bacterium known to cause Acne....
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANT ANT2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Acne vulgaris - sebum which is unable to escape The sebum becomes infected by bacteria which break down it down into fatty acids which in turn

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