General anaesthesia Breathing complications

General anaesthesia Breathing complications - General...

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General anaesthesia Breathing complications Pneumothorax: These can be open or closed – in the latter, the leak spontaneously closes off, while in the former the communication between the lung and the pleural space remains patent Tension pneumothorax: in which a small communication remains open only during inspiration so that the volume of air in the pleural space slowly or rapidly increases compressing the adjacent lung. Treatment: If the pneumothorax is small (less than 20%) and enclosed then the pneumothorax should be left to spontaneously resolve unless the patient has compromised respiratory function due to underlying lung disease. (In the presence of underlying lung disease aspiration or a chest drain may be required.) Large pneumothoraces should be aspirated. A syringe may be used to draw off up to 1500 mls of air. Larger volumes make it increasingly likely that the pneumothorax has not sealed and an intercostal drain may be required. Repeat chest X-rays should be taken to assess resolution of pneumothorax.
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General anaesthesia Breathing complications - General...

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