Hyperparathyroidism Causes

Hyperparathyroidism Causes - Epidemiology This is most...

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Hyperparathyroidism Causes PTH (parathyroid hormone): (Normally secreted in response to low Ca 2+ . 4 parathyroid glands situated posterior to the thyroid. Controlled by negative feedback Increased osteoclastic activity (releases Ca 2+ PO) from bones Increased Ca 2+ and reduced PO reabsorption in the kidney Active Vitamin D production increased INCREASED CALCIUM/REDUCED PHOSPHATE The cause is dependent on the type of hyperparathyroidism: Primary: Solitary adenoma (80%) Hyperplasia of all glands (20%) Cancer (<0.5%) Secondary: Reduced VitD intake Chronic renal failure Tertiary: after prolonged secondary hyper-PTH. Glands undergo hyperplasia and act autonoumously. -ve feedback lost. Seen in Chronic renal failure
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Unformatted text preview: Epidemiology This is most common in post-menopausal women Diagnosis Primary: The diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism is made by blood tests. Serum calcium levels are elevated. The serum chloride phosphate ratio is 33 or more in most patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. However, thiazide medications have been reported to causes ratios above 33. Urinary cAMP is occasionally measured; this is generally elevated. . Intact PTH levels are also elevated. Secondary: The PTH is elevated due to decreased levels of calcium or 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3. It is usually seen in cases of chronic renal disease or defective calcium receptors on the surface of parathyroid glands....
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Hyperparathyroidism Causes - Epidemiology This is most...

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