Acute liver failure

Acute liver failure - Acute liver failure Acute liver...

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Unformatted text preview: Acute liver failure Acute liver failure (ALF) is defined as a rapid decline in hepatic function . This is often determined by the presence of jaundice, reduced coagulopathy (INR >1.5), and signs of hepatic encephalopathy Classification Hyperacute if developed < 7 days Acute if developed between 8 – 28 days Subacute if developed between 29 days –12 weeks Epidemiology Wide age range (17-79 years old) Predominantly women Spontaneous recovery without liver transplantation = 45% Overall mortality rate= 30% Etiology Paracetamol hepatotoxicity (or acetaminophen in North America) accounts for approximately 50% of all cases of ALF. Other causes of ALF include: Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury Hepatitis B and A Autoimmune hepatitis Shocked liver Pathophysiology The process of acute liver failure is characterised by co-existing hepatocyte necrosis and apoptosis, which leads to organ failure Intentional or unintentional use of paracetamol (acetaminophen) is the predominant cause. Paracetamol Intentional or unintentional use of paracetamol (acetaminophen) is the predominant cause....
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course ANT ANT2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Acute liver failure - Acute liver failure Acute liver...

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