lect02 - PUBLIC TRANSPORT ORGANIZATIONAL MODELS: A CRITICAL...

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Nigel H.M. Wilson 1.259J/11.542J/ESD.227J, Fall 2006 Lecture 2 1 PUBLIC TRANSPORT ORGANIZATIONAL MODELS: A CRITICAL APPRAISAL AND PROSPECTS FOR FUTURE INDUSTRY RESTRUCTURING
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Nigel H.M. Wilson 1.259J/11.542J/ESD.227J, Fall 2006 Lecture 2 2 Outline Organizational models US Implementation Industry structure Prospects for the future
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Nigel H.M. Wilson 1.259J/11.542J/ESD.227J, Fall 2006 Lecture 2 3 Organizational Models Unregulated/Deregulated Regulated Competition Threatened Competition Private Monopoly Public Monopoly Contracting Out
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Nigel H.M. Wilson 1.259J/11.542J/ESD.227J, Fall 2006 Lecture 2 4 Six Organizational Models MODELS Unregulated Regulated Competition Threatened Competition Private Monopoly Public Monopoly Contracting Out Regulation Minimum Yes Yes* Yes Yes Yes* Financing PR PR PR PR PU PR Planning PR PU PU Ownership PR PR PR PR PU PR (or PU) Operation PR PR PR PR PU PR F U N C T I O N S Maintenance PR PR PR PR PU PR * The model is regulated in the form of contracts. PU: Public Sector; PR: Private Sector
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Nigel H.M. Wilson 1.259J/11.542J/ESD.227J, Fall 2006 Lecture 2 5 Organizational Models in the US Traditional regional public transport authority Enhanced public transportation authority Split policy and planning/operations entities
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Nigel H.M. Wilson 1.259J/11.542J/ESD.227J, Fall 2006 Lecture 2 6 A. "Classical" Regional Transit Authority (RTA) Characteristics: integrated policy and operations responsibilities single service provider (or equivalent) limited/non-existent role beyond transit limited range of services: fixed route ops, paratransit Example: RIPTA (Rhode Island); many others
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Nigel H.M. Wilson 1.259J/11.542J/ESD.227J, Fall 2006 Lecture 2 7 A. "Classical" Regional Transit Authority (RTA) Pros: strong coordination and control; clear accountability coherent image: strong public identification low conflict potential known, familiar option low overhead for smaller cities Cons: little long-range planning, except "monument building" little incentive for efficiency vulnerable to labor and political pressures narrow mandate isolated/remote from customers entrenched/resistant to change
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1.259J/11.542J/ESD.227J, Fall 2006 Lecture 2 8 B. Expanded RTA Model Characteristics: integrated policy and operations responsibilities single service provider (or equivalent) • expanded range of services: carpools, etc. expanded role re: land use planning
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lect02 - PUBLIC TRANSPORT ORGANIZATIONAL MODELS: A CRITICAL...

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