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flinchbaugh_thes - Implementing Lean Manufacturing Through...

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Implementing Lean Manufacturing Through Factory Design By Jamie W. Flinchbaugh B.S. Mechanical Engineering, Lehigh University, 1994 M.S. Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 1996 Submitted to the Sloan School of Management and the Department of Mechanical Engineering in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degrees of Master of Science in Management and Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology May 1998 © 1998 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Signature of Author Sloan School of Management Department of Mechanical Engineering Certified by David E. Hardt, Thesis Supervisor Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering Certified by Janice Klein, Thesis Supervisor Senior Lecturer, Sloan School of Management Accepted by Anthony T. Patera, Chairman of the Graduate Committee Department of Mechanical Engineering Accepted by Lawrence S. Abeln, Director of Master ’s Program Sloan School of Management
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Implementing Lean Manufacturing Through Factory Design By Jamie W. Flinchbaugh Abstract Factory design can play an important role in the diffusion of new technologies for manufacturing. Historically, factory design impeded the electrification of factories because there were significant interrelationships between the factory infrastructure and electric manufacturing processes. These interrelationships could not be fully leveraged partly because huge investments were tied up in the old factories but more importantly it took a long time for people to understand all of the interrelationships that constituted an entirely new technological system. I explore in this thesis that the diffusion of lean manufacturing suffers the same fate as factory electrification, and therefore exploring the interrelationships that make up lean manufacturing systems, including factories, will help extend the adoption of lean manufacturing in U.S. factories. I explore the relationships between factory design and lean manufacturing through two tools, axiomatic design and a queueing model. Axiomatic design is a process that helps the user derive the physical design parameters of the factory from the systems and functional requirements. The process helps draw out the explicit understanding of factory design and lean manufacturing and make it explicit. Axiomatic design helped me explore the essence of a lean factory, which can be summarized by the following features: independent departments through buffers and management structures, decentralized support activities to support problem solving and continuous improvement activities, and modular and scalable factory features which allow ease in continuous improvement in factory layout. I used the queueing model to explore the relationships between the various design parameters of the lean factory and throughput performance. Throughput can be improved by shortening line segments, increasing the quantity and size of accumulation buffers,
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This note was uploaded on 12/06/2011 for the course ESD 15.763j taught by Professor Davidsimchi-levi during the Spring '05 term at MIT.

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flinchbaugh_thes - Implementing Lean Manufacturing Through...

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