katzen_thesis

Katzen_thesis - Concurrently Designing a Physical Production System and an Information System in a Manufacturing Setting By James Alexander Scott

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Concurrently Designing a Physical Production System and an Information System in a Manufacturing Setting By James Alexander Scott Katzen B.S. Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1996 Submitted to the Sloan School of Management and the Department of Mechanical Engineering in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degrees of Master of Business Administration And Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering In conjunction with the Leaders For Manufacturing (LFM) Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology June 2003 © Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2003. Signature of Author_____________________________________________________________________ James Alexander Scott Katzen Sloan School of Management Department of Mechanical Engineering May 9, 2003 Certified by___________________________________________________________________________ Jeremie Gallien Assistant Professor of Operations Research, Sloan School of Management Thesis Supervisor Certified by___________________________________________________________________________ David Hardt Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering Thesis Supervisor Accepted by___________________________________________________________________________ Margaret Andrews Executive Director of Masters Program Sloan School of Management Accepted by___________________________________________________________________________ Ain Sonin Chairman of Graduate Committee Department of Mechanical Engineering
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2
Background image of page 2
Concurrently Designing a Physical Production System and an Information System in a Manufacturing Setting By James Alexander Scott Katzen B.S. Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1996 Submitted to the Sloan School of Management and the Department of Mechanical Engineering on May 9, 2003 in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degrees of Master of Business Administration And Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering In conjunction with the Leaders For Manufacturing (LFM) Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology June 2003 Abstract The advancement of information technology in manufacturing requires process architects to refine their procedures used to design new manufacturing systems. No longer can these designers implement a physical production system first, and then later incorporate a capable information system to control that production system. Rather, the physical production system and the information system must be designed concurrently to ensure the resulting system yields a seamless flow of information as well as physical material. This thesis reviews the traditional methodology used to design a physical production process. The major tools and steps of that methodology will be reviewed, and case examples will be provided showing how the traditional method is typically applied. Two major shortcomings of the design process (the neglecting of the flow of information and its overly sequential nature) will be identified. To address these shortcomings, specific concepts, models, and methods have been developed. These new tools form the structure of an improved design methodology for manufacturing processes.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/06/2011 for the course ESD 15.763j taught by Professor Davidsimchi-levi during the Spring '05 term at MIT.

Page1 / 193

Katzen_thesis - Concurrently Designing a Physical Production System and an Information System in a Manufacturing Setting By James Alexander Scott

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online