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MIT11_481Js09_lec23

MIT11_481Js09_lec23 - MIT OpenCourseWare http/ocw.mit.edu...

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MIT OpenCourseWare http://ocw.mit.edu 11.481J / 1.284J / ESD.192J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Growth Spring 2009 For information about citing these materials or our Terms of Use, visit: http://ocw.mit.edu/terms .
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Multiregional Planning Team, MIT CHINA’S REGIONAL ENERGY-INTENSITY ISSUES Professor Karen R. Polenske Massachusetts Institute of Technology Images courtesy of the Balanço Energético Nacional, Ministério de Minas e Energia do Brasil.
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Multiregional Planning Team, MIT ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We obtained production, consumption, employment, and other statistics from the officially published statistical yearbooks and several field surveys. Figures, tables, and photos are mainly from the book The Technology-Energy-Environment-Health (TEEH) Chain in China . We received partial funding for preparing this presentation from the BP seed grant as part of the MIT Energy Initiative. I sincerely thank ZHANG Xin, WU Ning, and Diana Jue for assistance in preparing the material and the powerpoint.
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Multiregional Planning Team, MIT IMPORTANT PHENOMENA IN CHINA Continuation of rapid Gross Domestic Product (GDP) increase (9-11% per year) In 2004, 17.4% of global carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions Large 67% energy-intensity (energy consumption per unit of GDP) decline from 1978-2004, but . . . Largest global consumer of coal, coke, steel, and other energy-intensive products
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Multiregional Planning Team, MIT ENERGY INTENSITY Energy intensity is defined as energy consumption per yuan of gross domestic product •China can reduce its CO 2 emissions by reducing the coal consumption, thus mitigating negative climate- change impacts. Latest (11 th ) five-year plan mandates reducing the national energy intensity by 20% by 2010 while maintaining GDP growth.
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Multiregional Planning Team, MIT THREE MEANS TO REDUCE ENERGY INTENSITY 1. Reduce total energy consumption; 2. Switch from high to lower carbon fuels; 3. Introduce new technologies, especially in high energy-intensive sectors, such as power generation, cokemaking, iron and steel plants, thus increasing their energy efficiency.
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Multiregional Planning Team, MIT ENERGY-INTENSITY SELECTED COUNTRIES,1980-2003 Notes: (1) GDP = gross domestic product, measured in 2000 US dollars. (2) Kgce = Kilograms of coal equivalent. (3) Units of energy consumption were converted from British thermal units to Kgce (1 million Btu=89 Kgce). Source: Compiled by the Multiregional Planning Research Team from Energy Information Administration (2005) data. 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 4.00 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Year Energy Intensity, kgce/constant 2000 U.S. dollar GDP United States Brazil Iran China India
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Multiregional Planning Team, MIT Notes: (1) GDP = gross domestic product, measured in 2000 US dollars. (2) Kgce = Kilograms of coal equivalent. (3) Units of energy consumption were converted from British thermal units to Kgce (1 million Btu=89 Kgce).
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