W11 Exam Key

W11 Exam Key - EEB 100, Winter 2011, Behavior Exam Key...

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EEB 100, Winter 2011, Behavior Exam Key (both versions of the exam—white and yellow--were identical) The test was long (in response to students in previous years who asked for more multiple choice questions worth fewer points each, I added more multiple choice questions not realizing that those on top of the essay questions made it a long test). People did pretty well on the multiple-choice questions and less well on the essay questions; some of which were designed to be a challenge. Unfortunately, this was also true for the long essay question that was given out beforehand! Because the distribution was shifted to the left, I added 32 points to everyone’s final raw score (view it as a ‘long-test bonus’). By adding 32 points to this exam, we shifted the class distribution to the right. My interpretation is that many of you are learning how to think like a conceptually focused behavioral biologist! The final percentage point distribution of the exam was: Please note: we reserve the right to add more points to the final grade distribution after the final so as to shift the class mean to the right. We will not formally ‘curve’ the class (which is putative because it means that the same number fail as get A’s).
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1, B 2, A 3, A 4, B 5, A 6, A 7, A 8, B 9, B 10, B 11, B 12, B 13, C 14, E 15, B 16, C 17, D 18, B 19, C 20, A 21, B (3 x 0.5 = 1.5) 22, C (2 x 0.5 + 3 x 0.25 = 1 + 0.75 = 1.75) 23, A because he made a net gain of 0.25 fitness units 24, C 25, C 26, C
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27, B 28, E 29, D 30, C—why? Clearly we’re dealing with organizational effects because we have no information about activational effects. Since males are more likely to disperse, we might assume that T is somehow involved. This restricts the answers to those male-biased litters…a and c. Of these two, c is a better choice because we assume that females are not producing T later in life, whereas dispersal age males are likely to. 31) What is h 2 ? What does it measure? What is one way you can empirically measure it? Explain your answer in detail using a graph. • h 2 = heritability • It explains how well the genotypic similarity of individuals predicts their phenotypic similarity in a population. • heritability = VG /(VG + VE) • where VG = contribution from genetic variation • and VE = contribution from environmental variation Can measure it empirically through a parent-offspring regression: (slope of the line equals the heritability). Or do a selection experiment:
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W11 Exam Key - EEB 100, Winter 2011, Behavior Exam Key...

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