01-intro-review

01-intro-review - Welcome Welcome to Biology 1334(Intro to...

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Unformatted text preview: Welcome Welcome to Biology 1334 (Intro to Biology II for nonmajors) “Zorak, you idiot! You’ve mixed incompatible species in the earth terrarium!” Introduction Introduction to Biology II BIOL 1334 1334 Dr. Jill DeVito LS 460 817-272-1225 This This class is for non-science majors. It is nonthe second semester in series. the second semester in a series. Requirements: BIOL 1333 or permission Textbook: Campbell et al., (6th edition) http://wps.aw.com/wps/media/access/Pearson_Default/1976/2024209/login.html Online Online access to Syllabus Class Notes Syllabus & Class Notes on the Blackboard system Blackboard (if the transition from WebCT goes well) https://elearn.uta.edu/webapps/login Please e-mail me the old-fashioned way (not through Blackboard) eold(not [email protected] Grading Grading Policy Grading Policy: Exams will contain a combination of question styles (e.g., multiple choice, matching, true/false). A typical exam will contain fifty questions. It will be your responsibility to contain fift It be responsibilit to bring bring a Scantron form 882E and No. 2 pencil to each exam. Grades will be awarded as follows: four lecture (midterm) exams each worth 25% of total grade worth 25% of total grade cumulative lecture final (optional) worth 25% of total grade 25% of total grade replaces low or missed midterm score semester grade: A = 90-100%, B = 80-90% C = 70-80%, D = 60-70%, F < 60% Grading Grading Policy Will I round up a grade of 69.3, 79.3, or 89.3 to the the next letter? No. Is there any possibility for an individual “extra credit” assignment to bring up my grade? No. MakeMake-up Exam Policy The optional cumulative final exam will replace your missed (or lowest) midterm score. Academic Academic dishonesty: consider yourself warned. yourself warned 1) Your neighbors are all eyes and ears. They will alert me. Th 2) I am required to report any potential violation. 3) The office of Student Conduct determines guilt (or lack of it). 4) I adjust your grade according to my own discretion. 5) Each case goes on your permanent UTA record (2 strikes...) UTA (2 Professional EProfessional E-mail Etiquette Please Do not ask about your grade by phone or e-mail. (Do come by in person to discuss). Do look up your grade on WebCT. They will be posted promptly. Do not assume that I will open an unidentified message from [email protected] ... 1) See below. 2) Sign your name. 1) 2) Si Do not use useless subject headings headings: student my exam “biology student” “my exam” Do use informative subject headings headings: Biol 2343 sec 1 question about ch 26 notes 2343 sec question about ch 26 notes Biol 1334 sec 2 athletic schedule conflict Oct 30 When you e-mail your instructor a question that is addressed in the you mail your instructor question that is addressed in the syllabus it sends the message that (at best) you are clueless and syllabus, disorganized or (at worst) you do not value your instructor’s time. A few more notes about etiquette (E-mail and otherwise). and otherwise) Do ask questions in class (instead of online) whenever possible. Oth Others may want to hear the answer, too. th Do send your message in a timely manner (several days). Do not send multiple messages about the same subject. Do not ask questions that are answered in the syllabus. A reputation for professional behavior is at least as important as at the performance on your transcript. Do be polite and respectful to your instructor (and your peers). or Do not talk during lectures or video clips. Do show up to an appointment with your instructor, or cancel with advance notice if necessary. How How to succeed in this class 1) The obvious (come to class, keep up with reading & notes) 2) Take detailed notes in the margins of your lecture outline. - everything I say in lecture is fair game - take notes on movie clips (they are fair game too) notes on movie clips (they are fair game too) - review exercises & study guides are for practice only - the lecture outline is your “comprehensive” study guide (obscure references from the text will not be on the exam) 3) Study with a buddy (seriously)! 4) Come to office hours to ask questions about lecture material. 5) Pick up your midterms as a study tool for the final. Biology is the study of living things • Life’s levels of organization define the scope of biology atoms molecules cells tissues organs systems organisms populations communities Biology is the study of living things • Life’s levels of organization define the scope of biology • Living organisms & their environment are interconnected organisms their environment are interconnected Biology is the study of living things • Life’s levels of organization define the scope of biology • Living organisms & their environment are interconnected organisms their environment are interconnected • Cells are the structural and functional units of life Biology is the study of living things • Life’s levels of organization define the scope of biology • Living organisms & their environment are interconnected organisms their environment are interconnected • Cells are the structural and functional units of life • All forms of life have common features DNA deoxyribonucleic acid Biology is the study of living things • Life’s levels of organization define the scope of biology • Living organisms & their environment are interconnected organisms their environment are interconnected • Cells are the structural and functional units of life • All forms of life have common features • Diversity of life can be arranged into three domains http://www.tolweb.org/tree/ prokaryotes prokaryotes (unicellular) protists The image cannot be display ed. Your computer may not hav e enough memory to open the image, or the image may hav e been corrupted. Restart y our computer, and then open the file again. If the red x still appears, y ou may hav e to delete the image and then insert it again. The image cannot be display ed. Your computer may not hav e enough memory to open the image, or the image may hav e been corrupted. Restart y our computer, and then open the file again. If the red x still appears, y ou may hav e to delete the image and then insert it again. Biology is the study of living things • Life’s levels of organization define the scope of biology • Living organisms & their environment are interconnected organisms their environment are interconnected • Cells are the structural and functional units of life • All forms of life have common features • Diversity of life can be arranged into three domains • Evolution explains the unity & diversity of life • individual variation • overproduction & competition competition • unequal reproductive success mechanism: natural selection product: evolutionary adaptations “Of course, long before you mature, most of you will be eaten.” Biology is the study of living things • Life’s levels of organization define the scope of biology • Living organisms & their environment are interconnected organisms their environment are interconnected • Cells are the structural and functional units of life • All forms of life have common features • Diversity of life can be arranged into three domains • Evolution explains the unity & diversity of life • Biology is connected to our lives in many ways li http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/involved/news.html http://www.npr.org/templates/topics/topic.php?topicId=1007 http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/ http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2007/planet.in.peril/ http://www.nature.com/news/index.html p n m d http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/index.html http://www.eurekalert.org/bysubject/biology.php Chapter 8 (Review) The Cellular Basis of Reproduction & Inheritance “Stimulus, response! Stimulus, response! Don’t you ever think?” • Cells are the basic structural and physiological units are the basic and physiological units of all living organisms • Cells are both distinct entities and building blocks di bl of more complex organisms (Cell Theory, Schleiden & Schwann 1838) • Cells arise only from preexisting cells arise onl from pree cells (Virchow’s Principle 1858) this means that... • Complete sets of genetic information are replicated Complete sets of genetic information are replicated and and passed on during cell division How do cells divide? 4 events must occur: events must occur: • reproductive signal from inside or outside cell • DNA replication • DNA segregation to each of the new cells • growth & cytokinesis (partitioning of cell contents) cytokinesis of cell contents) prokaryotes (single celled organisms without organelles; bacteria & ll archeans) reproduce via binary fission this involves mitosis (division of DNA) of DNA) daughter cells are genetically identical (clones) Some eukaryotes (many protists, some fungi) also reproduce via reproduce via binary fission... fission http://www.bbc.co.uk http://bhs.smuhsd.org http://ebiomedia.com http://www.cellsalive.com/cell_cycle.htm The cell cycle multiplies cells Recall the purpose of the nucleus in Eukaryotic cells... genetic material genome DNA deoxyribonucleic acid eukaryotic chromosome (DNA wrapped around proteins) = 2 identical sister chromatids identical sister chromatids attached by a centromere gene allele karyotype – standardized arrangement of all the chromosomes in arrangement of all the chromosomes in a cell; micrograph reveals number, sizes, shapes diploid cell “2N” contains two different copies of DNA diff DNA (one set from each parent) haploid cell “1N” contains only one copy of DNA (e.g., gamete; sperm or ovum) gamete sperm or ovum) diploid cell “2N” contains two different copies of DNA homologous chromosome pair -- same length, shape, and genes (loci) but not necessarily the same alleles In sexually reproducing organisms (many eukaryotes)... which cells are diploid? body cells which cells are haploid? gametes only Eukaryotes: two distinct cell division processes mitosis – nuclear division in eukaryotes leading to the formation of two daughter nuclei, each with a chromosome complement identical to that of id th the original nucleus 1 diploid cell 2 diploid cells diploid cell diploid cells http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072437316/student_view0/chapter11/animations.html# meiosis – division of a diploid nucleus to produce four haploid daughter cells; two successive nuclear di divisions with only one cycle of chromosome replication 1 diploid cell 4 haploid cells di http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072437316/student_view0/chapter12/animations.html# Review: Stages of Mitosis Review: Stages of Mitosis Cytokinesis differs for animal & plant cells animal plant In humans, where does meiosis occur? only in ovaries (to produce ova) & testes (to produce sperm) 2N female one large cell yields 1 viable ovum 3 polar bodies polar bodies 1N male one small cell yields 4 tiny sperm 2N 1N 1N 1N 1N 1N 1N 1N Remember: gametes have a single set of chromosomes! Review: Stages of Meiosis interphase interphase I homologous pairs separate prophase I metaphase I anaphase I Meiosis I chromatids separate telophase I prophase II metaphase II anaphase II telophase II cytokinesis cytokinesis Meiosis II crossing over may occur during prophase I production production of gametes human life cycle human growth growth & replacement of body cells ...
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