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10_Non-aqueous_Titrations - The major reason is that many...

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The major reason is that many acids and bases can’t be quantitatively in water at reasonable concentrations (~0.1M). The problem occurs when the pK A or pK B of our material is > 7. The endpoint is not a sharp break so is very difficult to detect. pK A 8 pK A 7 pK A 6 pK A 5 pK A 4 pK A 3 pH As the pK A increases, it becomes more difficult to detect the equivalence point. K B = K W K A = [ HA ] [ OH - ] [ A - ]
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K W K A = [HA] [OH - ] [A - ] (10 -4 ) 2 0.1 = = 10 -7
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With amphiprotic solvents, the solvent plays a significant role in determining the observed acid-base chemistry and titration curves. Non-ionizing solvents only act to transport on pairs. Aprotic solvents only contribute solubility. We’ll now look as several amphiprotic solvents. This amphiprotic solvent is commonly considered the ‘universal solvent’ High dielectric constant - 78.5 K W = 1.00 x 10 -14 pH scale 0 - 14 Strong acids are considered to dissociate completely producing H 3 O + . So H 3 O + is the only aqueous acid and OH- is the only aqueous base.
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