Lecture20 - Lecture Summary 20 Chapter 7 Alkenes Reactions...

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Lecture Summary 20 October 11, 2006 Chapter 7 - Alkenes: Reactions and Synthesis Addition of Carbenes The second method utilizes Zn to carry out overall an elimination of I and I from a carbon. Carbenes have dual reactivity and will form two bonds at once when presented with an alkene. In this way, cyclopropane structures are formed. This is a much more versatile method as many differentely substituted diiodoalkanes can be utilized. Zn C I H H I C I H H - Zn I 2 C H H empty p orbital filled sp 2 orbital carbene electron deficient Zn I Zn/Cu C H 2 I 2 C H H Zn/Cu I I Oxidation States of Organic Molecules Organic chemists think about oxidation states a little bit differently. Classically, the oxidation of an element occurs when it gives up an electron and becomes an ion. Since carbon molecules have mostly covalent bonds, we need to think about oxidation states a little bit more broadly. We think about a higher oxidized carbon as one that has more bonds to atoms that are more electronegative than it. Thus, in the chart below, methane would have the lowest oxidation state
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Lecture20 - Lecture Summary 20 Chapter 7 Alkenes Reactions...

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