Descartes essay

Descartes essay - Descartes argues in the statement "I...

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Descartes argues in the statement "I think, therefore I am (CS)" that thinking is enough to prove one's existence. I am going to explain what was meant by this statement by clarifying the terms and examining the argument. I believe Descartes investigated this issue in order to begin a basis for an unquestionable science, and that he wrote a valid argument to prove (CS). In stating (CS) Descartes is putting forth the argument: (1) I think Therefore, (2) I exist. Which states that premise (1) is necessary and sufficient to prove the conclusion (2). He claims to be able to prove his own existence using the premise that he has the ability to think the thought "I am, I exist (IA)." The idea behind this is showing that the existence of a person goes beyond the sensory world. Before setting up his argument for this claim, Descartes removes all ideas of sensory perception, saying "I have no senses. Body, shape, extension, movement and place are chimeras to me." By removing the things usually called upon when a question of existence is asked, he is
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This essay was uploaded on 04/06/2008 for the course PHIL 230 taught by Professor Bethel during the Spring '00 term at Cal Poly.

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Descartes essay - Descartes argues in the statement "I...

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