Belgium - Belgium Prepared by Group 4 Section A Contents...

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Belgium Prepared by : Group 4 –Section A Contents:
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Introduction Interpersonal Communication Cultural Systems Global Communication Comparison chart Negative Perception References Introduction
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Satellite View Location: Western Europe, bordering France 620 km, Germany 167 km, Luxembourg 148 km, Netherlands 450 km Capital: Brussels Climate: temperate; mild winters, cool summers; rainy, humid, cloudy Population: 10,348,276 (July 2004 est.) Ethnic Make-up: Fleming 58%, Walloon 31%, mixed or other 11% Government: federal parliamentary democracy under a constitutional monarch Interpersonal Communication
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Belgium is not a homogeneous country with one national identity. As such, it is therefore difficult to give a general overview that applies to all Belgians. Each area will have its own particularities. The three predominant cultures are: 1) in north, Flanders - primarily Dutch, 2) in the south, Wallonia - primarily French and 3) the northeast - primarily German influenced. The following are brief aspects that are applicable to all areas. Cultural Systems Belgian Family Values . Family plays a central role in most Belgians' lives. . The obligation to the family is a person's first priority. . Many people remain in the town in which they were raised, which creates close extended families. Appearances Matter . Appearances are important to Belgians. . They can often be seen washing the pavement or steps in front of their house or even sweeping the street. . Cleanliness is a matter of national pride. . Belgians take great pride in their houses. To have overgrown hedges or untidy gardens would disgrace the family and insult their neighbours. . Belgians take pride in their personal appearance too. They dress well and are concerned with the impression they make on others. Egalitarianism in Belgian Society . Belgium is on the whole an egalitarian society. . Women are not expected to change their name when they marry. . There are laws governing paternity as well as maternity leaves and laws forbidding sexual harassment in the workplace. Gift Giving Etiquette . If you are invited to a Belgian's house, bring flowers or good quality chocolates for the hostess. . Older Belgians may expect flowers to be unwrapped. . Do not give white chrysanthemums as they signify death. . Flowers should be given in an odd number, but not 13. . Liquor or wine should only be given to close friends. . Gifts are opened when received.
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Dining Etiquette . Belgians socialize in their homes and restaurants, although the home is reserved for family or close friends . If you receive a written invitation, the response must be written as well. . Wait for your host or hostess to introduce you to the other guests . Dress conservatively. Belgians take pride in their appearance and expect you to do the same. . Arrive on time. Punctuality demonstrates respect.
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2011 for the course MBA 0001 taught by Professor Akshat during the Spring '09 term at Institute of Management Technology.

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Belgium - Belgium Prepared by Group 4 Section A Contents...

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