Lecture 5

Lecture 5 - of the pm they can refuse a request under very...

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reserve powers are not written, they are precedents and understandings that can also be misunderstood usually we vote for our own pm, ie the largest parties leader becomes the pm but the HOC elects the pm in reality, because in the case of a minority govt and a coalition govt the pm is probs not the leader of the biggest party dismissing a pm: o provincial governments have been dismissed by federal governments the governor general certainly has discretion under the unwritten reserve powers the only person who can request a dissolution of the house (in affect an election) is the pm does not need the advice of the cabinet calling an election by the pm thus means that it can be used for partisan advantage the gg cannot call an election on dissolved parliament on their own, they need the advice
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Unformatted text preview: of the pm they can refuse a request under very narrow circumstances though (ie if the government were defeated in the HOC within the first 6 months) its important to ask who appoints the gg and what are the characteristics of a potential gg? the appointment of the gg can be used to partisan advantage under very limited circumstances the gg does have an important role as a check to the pm, thus it is vital that they are not partisan elected gg by a big majority of the HOC Topic 4 starting point (he said this was a teaser we could chew on over the weekend) does the HOC really play a role in the structure of power? Or is it a puppet? Has it become a dignified part of government too? (this is applicable only in majority government situations)...
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