10_1425_web_Lec_03_Falling

10_1425_web_Lec_03_Falling - Freely Falling Objects Physics...

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Freely Falling Objects Physics 1425 Lecture 3 Michael Fowler, UVa.
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Today’s Topics In the previous lecture, we analyzed one- dimensional motion, defining displacement, velocity, and acceleration and finding formulas for motion at constant acceleration. Today we’ll apply those formulas to objects falling, but first we’ll review how we know that falling motion is at constant acceleration.
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Galileo’s Idea Before Galileo, it was believed that falling objects quickly reached a natural speed, proportional to weight, then fell at that speed. Galileo argued that in fact falling objects continue to pick up speed (unless air resistance dominates) and that this acceleration is the same for all objects. But how to convince people? Watching a falling object, it’s all over so quickly.
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Galileo claimed people already knew this without realizing it: Imagine driving a nail into a board by dropping a weight on it from various heights. Everyone already knows that the further it falls, the more impact —which must mean it’s moving faster . But how much faster?
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2011 for the course PHYSICS 1425 taught by Professor Michaelfowler during the Spring '10 term at UVA.

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10_1425_web_Lec_03_Falling - Freely Falling Objects Physics...

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