10_1425_web_Lec_26_MoreHydrostatics

10_1425_web_Lec_26_MoreHydrostatics - More Hydrostatics...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
More Hydrostatics Physics 1425 Lecture 26 Michael Fowler, UVa
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Basic Concepts Atmospheric Pressure Buoyancy: Archimedes’ Principle
Background image of page 2
Clicker Question Galileo once observed that even a carefully constructed pump, situated at ground level, was not able to draw up water out of a well deeper than about thirty feet. Is this still the case? A. Yes B. No
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
How Suction Pumps Work Galileo hadn’t realized that a suction pump just lowers air pressure above the water in the pipe, then the outside atmospheric pressure pushes it up—and there’s a limit to how far up that pressure can push. Galileo’s pupil Torricelli was the first to understand, he built the first mercury barometer . He’d been ordered by his Grand Duke to figure out how to improve the pumps.
Background image of page 4
This is a water barometer in the Netherlands. About how tall is the column of water? A. 20 ft
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/07/2011 for the course PHYSICS 1425 taught by Professor Michaelfowler during the Spring '10 term at UVA.

Page1 / 15

10_1425_web_Lec_26_MoreHydrostatics - More Hydrostatics...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online