frde7560 - Reproductive Biology of the Endangered Shrub,...

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Reproductive Biology of the Endangered Shrub, Fremontodendron californicum subsp. decumbens, and its Conservation Implications Robert Boyd Department of Biological Sciences Auburn University
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3 taxa recognized Species, or subspecies Fremontodendron californicum Note F. decumbens ,1 site in El Dorado County, CA
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Fremontodendron californicum subsp. decumbens Found only near Pine Hill About 2,000 shrubs counted (<1mi radius) Listed federally endangered 1996 Pine Hill from SE
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Closer view Pine Hill chaparral F. californicum subsp . decumbens
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Small shrub 1-2 meters tall F. californicum subsp. decumbens
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Beautiful copper- colored flowers Fruit covered with stiff trichomes Seeds have orange appendage (elaiosome)
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Basic Reproductive Biology Document reproductive attrition Mark flower buds Determine fates Marking flower buds in spring A bud marked with wire at its base
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Basic Reproductive Biology Answer: insects attack flower buds, flowers, fruits 1.8% flower buds survive to produce seeds
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Basic Reproductive Biology Seed fates Predation: marked seeds (elaiosomes removed) in caged and uncaged locations under shrubs After 9 months extract & count surviving seeds Difference between caged/uncaged locations: rodent predation
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Basic Reproductive Biology Seed fates: Predation Answer: 90% seeds eaten by rodents
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Basic Reproductive Biology Seedling fates Seeds dormant unless heat-treated Plant heat-treated seeds in caged and uncaged plots Document fates in each case
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Basic Reproductive Biology Seedling fates Answer: Rodents eat some Insects eat most Rest die from drought during summer
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Reproduction Model
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Today’s story Pollination: insect visitors to flowers Dispersal: ants attracted to elaiosomes Focus on pollination and seed dispersal Important life cycle stages Involve mutualist animals
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Today’s story Pollination: insect visitors to flowers Dispersal: ants attracted to elaiosomes Focus on pollination and seed dispersal Important life cycle stages Involve mutualist animals What roles mutualists in reproduction of plant? What are conservation implications?
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Focus on pollination Are insect visitors required to make fruits?
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Focus on pollination Approach: enclose branches in bags to prevent insect visits Mark flowers already open with one color wire Mark large flower buds with another color
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2011 for the course BIOL 7560 taught by Professor Boyd,r during the Fall '08 term at Auburn University.

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frde7560 - Reproductive Biology of the Endangered Shrub,...

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