{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

√2011-09-07-Files and Pages

√2011-09-07-Files and Pages -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Database Management System, R. Ramakrishnan and J. Gehrke 1 Storing Data: Disks and Files
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Database Management System, R. Ramakrishnan and J. Gehrke 2 Storing and Retrieving Data Database Management Systems need to: – Store large volumes of data – Store data reliably (so that data is not lost!) – Retrieve data efficiently Alternatives for storage – Main memory – Disks – Tape
Background image of page 2
Database Management System, R. Ramakrishnan and J. Gehrke 3 Disks Secondary storage device of choice – Cheap – Stable storage medium – Random access to data Main problem – Data read/write times much larger than for main  memory – Positioning time in order of milliseconds How many instructions could a 3 GHz CPU process during  that time… Frequency (Hz) = 1 /period (s), 3*10^9/1000 = 3*10^6
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Database Management System, R. Ramakrishnan and J. Gehrke 4 Solution 1: Techniques for making                    disks faster Intelligent data layout on disk – Put related data items together Redundant Array of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) – Achieve parallelism by using many disks
Background image of page 4
Database Management System, R. Ramakrishnan and J. Gehrke 5 Solution 2: Buffer Management  Keep “currently used” data in main memory – How do we do this efficiently? Typical (simplified) storage hierarchy: – Main memory (RAM) for currently used data – Disks for the main database (secondary storage) – Tapes for archiving older versions of the data (tertiary  storage)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Database Management System, R. Ramakrishnan and J. Gehrke 6 Outline  Disk technology and how to make disk read/writes  faster Buffer management Storing “database files” on disk
Background image of page 6
Database Management System, R. Ramakrishnan and J. Gehrke 7 Components of a Disk  Platters  The platters spin (say, 10K rpm). Spindle  The arm assembly is moved  in or out to position  a head on  a desired track. Tracks under  heads  make    a  cylinder   (imaginary!). Disk head Arm movement Arm assembly  Only one head  reads/writes at any one  time. Tracks Sector  Block size  is a multiple             of  sector size  (which is fixed).
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Database Management System, R. Ramakrishnan and J. Gehrke 8 Accessing a Disk Page Time to access (read/write) a disk block: seek time  ( moving arms to position disk head on track ) rotational delay  ( waiting for block to rotate under head ) transfer time  ( actually moving data to/from disk surface ) Seek time and rotational delay dominate.
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}