Ch 14 Notes Social Psychology

Ch 14 Notes Social Psychology - Social Psychology Chapter...

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Unformatted text preview: Social Psychology Chapter 14 AP Psychology Forest Grove High School Mr. Tusow A Question A Question We have learned about a number of different fields within psychology. What do you think social psychology is? Social Psychology Social Psychology Social psychology: Psychology that studies the effects of social variables and cognitions on individual behavior and social interaction. Social psychology looks at how people’s thoughts, feelings, perceptions, motives and behavior are influenced by other people. It tries to understand behavior and mental processes within its social context . Social Context Social Context Social context includes the real, imagined, or symbolic presence of other people; the activities and interactions that take place among people; the settings in which behavior occurs; and the expectations and social norms governing behavior in a given setting (Sherif, 1981). Major Themes of Major Themes of Social Psychology Social Psychology There are three major themes of social psychology that we will look at: 1. The power of social situations 2. Subjective social reality 3. The promotion of human condition Situationism vs. Dispositionism Situationism vs. Dispositionism Situationism: A view that says environmental conditions influence people’s behavior as much or more than their personal disposition does. Dispositionism: A view that says internal factors (genes, traits, character qualities) influence our behavior more than the situation we are in. Regardless of your view, people’s behavior depends heavily on two factors: the social roles they play, and the social norms of the group. Social Standards of Behavior Social Standards of Behavior Social Roles: One of several socially defined patterns of behavior that are expected of persons in a given setting or group. The roles people assume may be the result of a person’s interests, abilities and goals, or they may be imposed on a person by cultural, economic or biological conditions. Social Standards of Behavior Social Standards of Behavior Social Norms: A group’s expectations regarding what is appropriate and acceptable for it’s members’ attitudes and behaviors in given situations. Social Norms in Our Life Social Norms in Our Life Turn to the person next to you and come up with at least 3 social norms you see in our community: Forest Grove High School Forest Grove (the city) Oregon Social Pressure Social Pressure Social pressure can create powerful psychological effects such as prejudice, discrimination, blind obedience, and violence.as prejudice, discrimination, blind obedience, and violence....
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2011 for the course PSYCH 111 taught by Professor Larson during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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Ch 14 Notes Social Psychology - Social Psychology Chapter...

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