Ch 5 Notes Consciousness

Ch 5 Notes Consciousness - AP Psychology Forest Grove High...

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AP Psychology Forest Grove High School Mr. Tusow
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Consciousness Consciousness: The process underlying the mental model we create of the world of which we are aware. It is also a part of the mind from which we can potentially retrieve a fact, an idea, an emotion, or a memory and combine it with critical thinking. Can you make an argument that you are who/what your consciousness allows?
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The Big Challenge In psychology, the big challenge presented by consciousness is that it is so subjective and illusive. How do we prove that we have consciousness?
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Competing Views (review of CH 1) Structuralists used introspection (self-reporting) to find the boundaries of conscious thought. Behaviorists , like John Watson, sought to take the mind out of psychology. After all, he argued, there is no real way to see inside of it. As a result, psychology became a science of behavior without a consciousness or a mind.
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The Mind Returns In the 1960s, psychologists began to question the behaviorist model for two reasons. First, there were psychological issues which needed better explanation than behaviorism could offer. Quirks of memory, perceptual illusions, drug induced states (very popular in the 1960s)
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The Mind Returns Second, technological innovations let psychologists look at the brain in ways that Watson had never dreamed about. Cognitive neuroscience involved cognitive psychology, neurology, biology, computer science and linguistics.
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The Conscious Mind The conscious mind can take on a variety of roles, but it must focus sequentially on one thing and then another. Multitasking is not all it is cracked up to be. Are the hands-free device laws in Oregon and Washington a good thing?
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The Nonconscious Process The nonconscious mind is great at multitasking. Where the conscious mind has the ability to focus on just one task, the nonconscious mind has no such restrictions. The conscious mind has to process things serially, while the nonconscious mind can handle many streams of information at the same time, called parallel processing . Walking, chewing gum and breathing
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What Consciousness Does Our consciousness has 3 main functions: 1. Consciousness restricts our attention. It keeps our brain from being overwhelmed by stimulation by processing things serially and limiting what we notice and think about-this is called selective attention 2. Consciousness provides us with a mental “meeting place.” Where sensation combines with memory, emotions and motives-this is the binding problem
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3. Consciousness allows us to create a mental model of the world that we can manipulate. Unlike other, simpler organisms, we are not prisoners of the moment: We don’t just act reflexively to stimulation. Humans are the only animal with the ability to set goals.
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Ch 5 Notes Consciousness - AP Psychology Forest Grove High...

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