Ch 8 Notes Emotion and Motivation

Ch 8 Notes Emotion and Motivation - Chapter 8 AP Psychology...

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Chapter 8 AP Psychology Mr. Tusow
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What is Emotion? Emotion is a 4 part process consisting of physiological arousal, cognitive interpretation, subjective feelings, and behavioral expression. While our emotions are very different, they all involve a state of mental and physical arousal focused on some event of importance.
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Emotion Basics Emotion and motivation are complimentary process. The concept of emotion emphasizes arousal, both physical and mental, while motivation emphasizes how this arousal becomes action. Emotions help us respond to important situations and to convey our intentions to others.
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Why We Have Emotions Emotions are the result of genetics and learning, especially early in life. Emotions serve as arousal states that help organisms cope with important recurring situations. Learned emotional responses, along and genetics are both important components of many psychological disorders, including depression, anxiety disorders and phobias.
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Universality of Emotions Despite different languages, cultures and social norms, studies suggest that people “speak and understand substantially the same ‘facial language’ the world around.” Essentially, people share a set of universal emotion expressions that give support to the idea of a biological heritage of the human species.
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Seven Basic Emotions Paul Ekman, a leading psychologist in emotions, suggests humans everywhere can recognize seven basic emotions: sadness, fear, anger, disgust, contempt, happiness and surprise . Anger Happiness Disgust Surprise Sadness Fear
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Display Rules According to Ekman, the seven emotions are universal, but the display rules vary greatly, depending on the culture. He defines display rules as the permissible ways of displaying emotions in a given society.
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Anger
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Contempt
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Disgust
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Fear
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Happiness
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Sadness
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Surprise
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Reading Emotion In addition to being universal, the ability to read facial expressions is nearly ageless. Psychologists think that children as young as 5 years old have the same ability to recognize emotion on a person’s face as an adult does.
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More Emotions While we can recognize Ekman’s seven emotions, most of us can think of others like greed, envy, regret, optimism, etc. Robert Plutchik suggests that rather than seven, we have eight primary emotions and eight secondary emotions. He depicts this in his “Emotion Wheel.” More complex emotions occur when pairs of adjacent emotions combine. Ex: love is a combination of joy and acceptance.
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Origins of Emotions The biggest breakthrough in the study of emotions was the discovery of two distinct emotional pathways in the brain. One of the pathways is
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2011 for the course PSYCH 111 taught by Professor Larson during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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Ch 8 Notes Emotion and Motivation - Chapter 8 AP Psychology...

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