Ch 10 Notes Personality

Ch 10 Notes Personality - Chapter10 Personality...

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Chapter 10 Personality AP Psychology Mr. Tusow
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Personality Personality:  The psychological qualities that bring a  consistency to an individual’s thoughts and behaviors  in different situations and at different times. Personality is a continuously changing process, shaped by  our individual needs and cognitions and by external  pressures from the social environment. It is the thread that consistently runs through our lives.
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Two Main Theories Psychodynamic Theory:  Freud’s theory that calls  attention to motivation, especially unconscious  motives, and the influence of our past experiences. Humanistic Theory:  A theory that emphasizes the  present, subjective reality-what we believe is important  now, what we think of ourselves in relation to others is  important now.
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Clinical Perspective The clinical perspective utilizes a combination of the  psychodynamic and humanistic theories. This is most  often used by psychologists who are working with  people who are seeking counseling.
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Social Cognitive Theory Social-cognitive theory derives from experiments in  psychology rather than clinical work.  This theory is based on the idea that personality is a  result of learning, perception and social interaction. Despite what it seems, social-cognitive theory and clinical  perspective compliment each other and share some  common ideas.
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Psychodynamic Theories Although there are a variety of psychodynamic  theories, they originate with Freud’s psychoanalytic  theory. In this theory, Freud said the unconscious, the hidden  parts of the mind, was a source of powerful impulses,  instincts, motives, and conflicts that energize  personality.
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Psychoanalysis Psychoanalysis focuses on how the mind’s energy is  exchanged, transformed and expressed. The “mental stream” of the sex drive was called the Eros,  he Greek god for passionate love. The energy behind this  drive was called libido, Latin for lust. The “mental stream” for destruction was Thanatos. Freud  called it the “death instinct” that drives aggressive and  destructive acts humans commit against each other. 
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Personality Structure Freud saw human  personality as an iceberg  with three parts: the  Ego,  Superego  and  Id In this model, the  superego and the id were  antagonist parts,  regulated by the ego. Id Superego Ego Conscious mind Unconscious mind
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The Id In Freud’s model, the id is the primitive, unconscious  reservoir that houses the basic motives, drives and  instinctive desires that determine our personalities.  Always acts on impulse and seeks immediate pleasure The only part of the personality present at birth
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Ch 10 Notes Personality - Chapter10 Personality...

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