SFL 354 Syllabus - fall 11

SFL 354 Syllabus - fall 11 - SFL 354, Section 001...

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SFL 354, Section 001 Fall 2011 MWF, 2-2:50 Instructor: Roy Bean, Ph.D., Associate Professor, SFL Phone: 422-2349 Office: 258 TLRB Office Hours: 9:30-10:30 am, Thursdays Required Texts/Materials: Roopnarine, J. L., & Gielen, U. P. (2005). Families in global perspective . Boston, MA: Pearson Education. Packet of Readings (at BYU Bookstore) Readings (to be distributed) Purpose This course is designed to examine issues of national/ethnic culture and gender as they relate to individual and family development. A major goal will be to help students be more culturally aware of families globally and more responsive to groups that have been marginalized in the past. Objectives (By the end of this course, students WILL): 1. Decide the importance of considering culture as an important contextual factor for understanding human development and relationships. 2. Decide the importance of considering gender as an important contextual factor for understanding human development and relationships. 3. Develop awareness of one’s own cultural and gender-based values and beliefs. 4. Recognize biases inherent in the perspective of the dominant U.S. culture. 5. Engage in class (and out-of-class) discussions about class topics 6. Be better positioned as a citizen of the world, in terms of valuing diversity and being able to analyze world cultures for how they might benefit (or cost) individual and family development. Class Policies and Expectations 1. No cheating or plagiarism. Every student in this class has agreed to abide by the Honor Code and Dress and Grooming Standards. If you fail to do so, it shows a lack of respect for peers, teachers, and our sponsoring institution – the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In case of academic dishonesty, students will receive an E on that part of the course (such as a paper, homework, exam, etc). Plagiarism (copying someone else’s work, including items on websites and passing it off as your own work without proper attribution) is considered academic dishonesty. See http://honorcode.byu.edu/index for specific examples of intentional, inadvertent plagiarism, fabrication, and falsification. If the dishonesty involves a major portion of the course requirements, such as an exam or a writing assignment, the student may receive an E for the entire course. If the dishonesty involves a person knowingly allowing his or her work to be copied, then action will also be taken against that person. Academic dishonesty of any type will be reported to the University Honor Code Office. 2. Be respectful of other class members. Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 prohibits sex discrimination against any participant in an educational program or activity receiving federal funds. The act is intended to eliminate sex discrimination in education. Title IX covers discrimination in programs, admissions, activities, and student-to-student harassment. BYU’s policy against sexual harassment extends
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2011 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 321 taught by Professor Reber during the Fall '10 term at BYU.

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SFL 354 Syllabus - fall 11 - SFL 354, Section 001...

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