lecture_Ch15[1]

lecture_Ch15[1] - Drugs and Behavior Inhalants PSY 291...

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Drugs and Behavior Inhalants PSY 291
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Inhalants Diverse group of volatile (readily evaporated at low temperatures) substances whose chemical vapors can be inhaled to produce psychoactive effects. While other abused substances can be inhaled, the term “inhalants” is used to describe substances that are rarely, if ever, taken by any other route of administration. Many of these substances were never intended to be used by humans as drugs; consequently, they are not often thought of as having abuse potential.
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Inhalants Introduced via lungs - sniffing, snorting – directly from source container - bagging – from plastic bags - huffing – from soaked rags or bandannas held over the mouth Intoxicating and euphorigenic effects
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Who Abuses? 15 – 16 % of all U.S. 8th graders have misused an inhalant at least once in their lifetime. Inhalants are among the most commonly used drugs by adolescents.
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Considerations Synergistic effects - often contain several different chemicals which may have synergistic interactions Often lipid (oil or fat)-rich composition - Stored in body organs that store fat - Accumulation with continued use Developmentally immature users - Nervous system and body function development continues into late teens - given the variety of potential effects of inhalants, we have much to learn about young people’s susceptibilities
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Acute Effects: - Nausea - Cough/sneeze (airway irritation) Low Doses: - Light-headedness - Loss of control and disorientation Higher Doses/ Toxic effects: - Relaxation to depression to coma, etc. - Damage heart, kidneys, brain - Hypoxia (oxygen deficiency) - SSDS (Sudden Sniffing Death Syndrome): A condition characterized by serious cardiac arrhythmia occurring during or immediately after inhaling Effects Accidents associated with intoxication and fires Choking on vomit
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Legislation Inhalants are generally not regulated under the Controlled Substances Act. Some states have adopted laws preventing the use, sale, and/or distribution to minors of various products abused commonly as inhalants.
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Volatile substances - Subgroups on next page Anesthetics - Nitrous oxide (CNS depressant) Nitrites - vasodilation; muscle relaxant - prescribed for angina - used as sexual enhancer Classification
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Aerosols/Propellant gases - chemical and cold injuries Toluene ( Glues, Paints, Thinners, Nail Polish, etc.) - brain, liver, and kidney damage Gasoline / Benzene - Freon - Liver injuries, loss consciousness, freeze injuries, lung collapse Volatile Substances
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Legally obtained
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lecture_Ch15[1] - Drugs and Behavior Inhalants PSY 291...

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