lecture_Ch12[1]

lecture_Ch12[1] - Drugs and Behavior Hallucinogens PSY 291

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Drugs and Behavior Hallucinogens PSY 291
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http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=gPgpYux8HJQ&NR=1
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Hallucinogens Hallucinogens are substances that alter sensory processing in the brain, causing: - perceptual disturbances - changes in thought processing - depersonalization (malfunction or anomaly of the mechanism by which an individual has self-awareness. It is a feeling of watching oneself act, while having no control over a situation) Hallucinogens sometimes are described as causing a spiritual-like experience.
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Aztec Maya Inca India Rome Greece Egypt Historically, hallucinogens have been most commonly used in religious or shamanic rituals.
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Human poisoning due to the consumption of rye bread made from ergot-infected grain was common in Europe in the Middle Ages ( ergotism ). The hysterical symptoms of young women that had spurred the Salem witch trial had been the result of consuming ergot-tainted rye. In 1938 LSD was first synthesized from ergot alkaloids by the Swiss chemist, A. Hofmann. Through careful screening out of the ergot stage, ergotism is now rare. Ergot fungus
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History of Hallucinogens In the United States before the 1960’s abuse of hallucinogens was a minor social problem. They could be obtained from chemical supply houses with no restriction. In 1960’s racial struggles, Vietnam War protests, “hypocrisy of establishment” caused many people to run away from reality by using hallucinogens.
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History of Hallucinogens 1965 Legislation against hallucinogen use The Native American Church - Peyote 1978 Act protected religious use (The American Indian Religious Freedom Act)
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History of Hallucinogens 1960’s Timothy Leary and the League of Spiritual Discovery – LSD (1966) The Psychedelic Experience Some mental health providers claim these drugs can assist with psychotherapy.
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Psychedelic Psychotogenic Psychotomimetic Expand or heighten perception and consciousness Initiate psychotic behavior Cause psychosis-like symptoms Nature of Hallucinogen Effects
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Effects Typical user experience several stages of sensory experiences. During a single “trip” they can go though all stages or just some of them. Altered senses
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2011 for the course PSY 291 taught by Professor Michalkraszpulski during the Fall '11 term at Wright State.

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lecture_Ch12[1] - Drugs and Behavior Hallucinogens PSY 291

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