Chap7 - Chapter 7: The Modernist Temperament 1885-1940...

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Chapter 7: The Modernist Temperament 1885-1940 Characterized by a rejection of the belief that art should represent human behavior and the physical world Representationalism Representationalism
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Symbolism First artistic movement to reject representationalism Launched in 1885 Truth beyond objective examination cannot be discovered through the 5 senses can only be intuited can only be hinted at through a network of symbols
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Symbolism Theatrical Conventions : Subjects taken from: the past the realm of fancy the mysterious present Symbolist drama tended to be vague and mysterious Most important aspect of production = mood or atmosphere Minimal scenery that lacked detail Gauze curtain hung between audience and stage = scrim ; represented the mist or a timeless void
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Symbolism Theatrical Conventions : Color chosen for mood Text often chanted Actors incorporated unnatural gestures Productions often baffled audiences Symbolist Theatre Movement ceased by 1900
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Significance of Symbolism Disrupted practice of using the same conventions to stage all plays during a particular period Prior to the 20 th century, artistic movements occurred linearly During the 20 th century, several artistic movements occurred simultaneously Each movement had its own premises about nature and truth Each movement had its own set of conventions Shift from absolute values to relative values
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Appia, Craig, and Reinhardt Adolphe Appia (1862-1928) Viewed artistic unity in theatre as fundamental, but difficult to achieve because of conflicting elements: horizontal plane vertical plane moving actor
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Appia, Craig, and Reinhardt Adolphe Appia (1862-1928) Replaced flat, painted scenery with 3-dimensional scenic structures Used steps , platforms , and ramps to bridge the horizontal and vertical planes Used lighting from various directions and angles Viewed lighting as most flexible of the theatrical elements Could change moment to moment Could reflect shifts in mood and emotion Unified all other elements through intensity, color, direction, movement
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2011 for the course THE 1000 taught by Professor Chu during the Spring '10 term at Santa Fe College.

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Chap7 - Chapter 7: The Modernist Temperament 1885-1940...

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