Fame or Failure Beowulf OED

Fame or Failure Beowulf OED - Harris 1 Connor Harris Dr....

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Harris 1 Connor Harris Dr. Terry English 231 30 Sept 2010 Fame or Failure “Beowulf,” the longest surviving poem in Old English, consists of a multitude of symbolisms and themes throughout the literature. Being so highly acclaimed, leaves the piece susceptible to criticism and debate, the most prominent being the argument between Christianity and Paganism and their implications throughout the text. Most interesting to me, however, was the conflict of hero and conceder, often emphasized throughout the story. This contradiction is emphasized most prominently when the last words of the poem are uttered: “eager for fame” (“Beowulf” 100). In order to determine whether Beowulf should be looked up, or down upon, one must first dissect the words, eager and fame, then look at its implications as the two words are combined. Severe, violent, biting, sour, imperfectly tempered, impetuous, impatient are words that have been used to define eager as far back as the late 13 th century and have gone relatively unchanged as recent as the 19 th century and its present meaning (“Eager”). The theme throughout seems to be the negative connotation attributed to each. Thus, one would assume that the term,
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Fame or Failure Beowulf OED - Harris 1 Connor Harris Dr....

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