Makesenoughenergytolastforabout15seconds glycogen

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Unformatted text preview: ing glycogen, fatty acids, and amino acids Creatine phosphate + ADP ↔ creatine + ATP Cr ea tin e p h os ph a te + AD P↔ cr ea t in e + AT P Energy for Contraction • ATP­ immediate source of energy that last for only 5 seconds • Creatine Phosphate­ high energy molecule that is used to make ATP. – Makes enough energy to last for about 15 seconds • Glycogen­ storage form of glucose – with oxygen can use the glycolytic­Krebs cycle pathway to produce ATP (aerobic respiration) • most efficient method of energy production – without oxygen can use glycolytic pathway with end product of lactic acid (anaerobic respiration) • can provide enough energy for 30 seconds of maximal activity All or None Principle • Threshold stimulus­ the weakest stimulus from a neuron that can still initiate a contraction. • All­or­none principle­ when stimulated, a motor unit will contract to its fullest; a motor unit cannot partially contract. – When a whole muscle contracts, not all motor units are contracted. The more strength that is needed, the more motor units that are recruited. Muscle Tissue and Homeostasis • Oxygen Debt – during exercise, the muscles must have an increased supply of oxygen • blood vessels dilate and blood flow increases – when muscular exertion is to great, oxygen cannot be supplied to the muscles fast enough, resulting in the conversion to anaerobic respiration. This causes a build up of lactic acid. – After exercise stops, extra oxygen is required to • metabolize the lactic acid • replenish ATP, creatine phosphate, glycogen • pay back oxygen borrowed from hemoglobin, lungs, myoglobin, and body fluids – Oxygen debt is paid back by labored breathing after exercise...
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