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Female Reproductive System - Adolescence Puberty p...

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Adolescence p Puberty  p Burst of hormones activate maturation of the  gonads: ovaries p Begins: 8-13 yrs of age p Abnormally early = precocious puberty p Delayed =Primary Amenorrhea
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Function of Female Reproductive  System p Produce sex hormones p Produce functioning gamates [ova] p Support & protect developing embryo
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General Physical Changes p Axillary & pubic hair growth p Changes in body conformation [widening of hips,  development of breasts] p Onset of first menstrual period  [menarche] p Mental changes
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Data from the 1998 Canadian GSS. Students living at home aged 15- 19.
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THE EMOTIONAL HEALTH OF ADOLESCENT  GIRLS A CONCERN p Our analyses show that adolescent girls in the 15 to 19 age group  may be more emotionally vulnerable today than they were in the  1980s. Girls surveyed in 1998 reported higher levels of time  pressure and stress, and were less satisfied with their life, self- esteem, and the way they spent time than boys.  p they assessed their health lower than the boys, and reported having  more difficulty falling asleep.  p The most surprising finding is, that girls' levels of life satisfaction and  satisfaction with their self-esteem were in 1998 lower than those  reported by adult employed women, who face considerably greater  work challenges and time pressures. Source: Zuzanek, J. (2000).  The effects of time use and time pressure on child- parent relationships.  Waterloo: Otium Publications
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Major Organs p Ovaries [ gonads] p Uterine tubes [ fallopian tubes] p Uterus p Vagina p Accessory glands p External genitalia p Breasts
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ovaries p Each ovary is about the size and shape of an  almond. In young women the ovaries are about 1 ½  -  2 inches long, 1 inch wide & 1/3 inch thick.  After  menopause they tend to shrink.  p they produce eggs (also called ova) every female is  born with a lifetime supply of eggs p they also produce hormones: Estrogen  & Progesterone   Male Homolog  = testes 
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oogenesis p when the girl becomes sexually mature, the  primary oocytes recommence their development,  usually one at a time and once a month.  p The primary oocyte grows much larger and  completes the meiosis I, forming a large  secondary oocyte  and a small  polar body  that  receives little more than one set of  chromosomes. 
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oogenesis p In humans (and most vertebrates), the first polar  body does not go on to meiosis II, but the  secondary oocyte does proceed as far as  metaphase  of meiosis II and then stops.  p Only if  fertilization  occurs will meiosis II ever be  completed. Entry of the sperm restarts the cell  cycle 
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