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L1.sp11 - CS525 Advanced Distributed Systems Spring 2011...

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1 CS525 Advanced Distributed Systems Spring 2011 Indranil Gupta (Indy) Lecture 1 January 18, 2011 All Slides © IG
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2 What is a Distributed System? (examples) The Internet Gnutella peer to peer system Food Web of Little Rock Lake, WI A Sensor Network
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3 Can you name some examples of Operating Systems?
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4 Can you name some examples of Operating Systems? Linux WinXP Vista Unix FreeBSD Mac OSX 2K Aegis Scout Hydra Mach SPIN OS/2 Express Flux Hope Spring AntaresOS EOS LOS SQOS LittleOS TINOS PalmOS WinCE TinyOS
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5 What is an Operating System?
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6 What is an Operating System? User interface to hardware (device driver) Provides abstractions (processes, file system) Resource manager (scheduler) Means of communication (networking)
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7 FOLDOC definition The low-level software which handles the interface to peripheral hardware, schedules tasks, allocates storage, and presents a default interface to the user when no application program is running. The OS may be split into a kernel which is always present and various system programs which use facilities provided by the kernel to perform higher-level house-keeping tasks, often acting as servers in a client-server relationship. Some would include a graphical user interface and window system as part of the OS, others would not. The operating system loader, BIOS, or other firmware required at boot time or when installing the operating system would generally not be considered part of the operating system, though this distinction is unclear in the case of a roamable operating system such as RISC OS. The facilities an operating system provides and its general design philosophy exert an extremely strong influence on programming style and on the technical cultures that grow up around the machines on which it runs.
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8 Can you name some examples of Distributed Systems?
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9 Can you name some examples of Distributed Systems? Client-server (e.g., NFS) The Internet The Web An ad-hoc network A sensor network DNS BitTorrent (peer to peer overlays) Datacenters
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10 What is a Distributed System?
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11 FOLDOC definition A collection of (probably heterogeneous) automata whose distribution is transparent to the user so that the system appears as one local machine. This is in contrast to a network, where the user is aware that there are several machines, and their location, storage replication, load balancing and functionality is not transparent. Distributed systems usually use some kind of client-server organization.
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12 Textbook definitions A distributed system is a collection of independent computers that appear to the users of the system as a single computer [Andrew Tanenbaum] A distributed system is several computers doing something together. Thus, a distributed system has three primary characteristics: multiple computers, interconnections, and shared state [Michael Schroeder]
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13 Unsatisfactory Why are these definitions short?
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