Lecture_5

Lecture_5 - the plane. Only gravity will not be in along an...

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2D & 3 D
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Same basic principles to describe motion Position Velocity Acceleration Force Newton's Laws Must use vectors!
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Statics (Translational) Equilibrium – velocity and acceleration are 0. Applies to many, practical cases: bridges, buildings, … F = 0 ( condition for equilibrium ) F x = 0 F y = 0 F z = 0 ( for 3D ) F x = 0 F y = 0 ( for 2D )
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Example
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Vector Forces Board
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Example
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Inclines Chose coordinates so that there are fewest components to calculate Normal force will be perpendicular to plane. It will not equal mg! Acceleration and friction will be along
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Unformatted text preview: the plane. Only gravity will not be in along an axis. Projectile Motion x and y directions are separately considered. Acceleration in both directions is constant (-g for y, 0 m/s for x) so we can use kinematics equations. Independence of directions Independence of Directions Shoot the Monkey Examples Motion of the Baseball: Where is the acceleration 0? Where is the vertical component of the velocity 0? Where is the force on the ball 0? Where is the speed 0?...
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Lecture_5 - the plane. Only gravity will not be in along an...

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