Lecture_15

Lecture_15 - independent (ex: water, most liquids)....

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Pressure, density, fluids
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Fluids Liquid or gas Flows from one place to another Shape depends on container Still use Newton's Laws
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Pressure The form of Newton's 2 nd Law that we know so far doesn't make much sense for fluids Rewrite it: Force is always perpendicular to the surface. Pressure is a scalar. A fluid can only push on a surface Units pascal (Pa) = N/m 2 F = m a P = F A
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Atmospheric Pressure P atm = 1.01 x 10 5 Pa For a sheet of paper, this is about 5,000 N! Why doesn't the paper bend? Same for many objects Example: nonevacuated disks For some objects, the force from atmospheric pressure is obvious. Examples: evacuated disks, suctions cups
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Pressure Gauges P abs = P gauge + P atm Gauge converts this to a pressure
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Density Incompressible – density and pressure are
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Unformatted text preview: independent (ex: water, most liquids). Compressible density changes with pressure (most gases, some liquids) Table of some densities is on pg.314. Note density can depend on temperature. = M V [ kg m 2 ] Pressure and Gravity Atmospheric pressure arises because of the weight of the fluid pushing down on an object. Pressure increases with depth because there is more weight An object floating submerged in a fluid (in equilibrium) Examples U-tube How does a straw work? IV vs blood pressure. Pascal's Principle If the pressure at one location in a closed container of fluid changes, this change is transmitted to all locations in the fluid Examples: Cartesian Divers, Hydraulics...
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Lecture_15 - independent (ex: water, most liquids)....

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