Lecture_16 - Buoyancy & Fluid Dynamics Buoyancy...

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Buoyancy & Fluid Dynamics
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Buoyancy Archimedes's Principle: When an object is immersed in a fluid, the fluid exerts an upward force on the object that is equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object Buoyant force arises because of the differences in the pressures on the top and the bottom of the object (which arise because of the weight of the fluid).
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Buoyant Force If an object with an area A and height h is submerged in a liquid of density ρ liq , the buoyant force of the liquid, F liq , on the object is F liq =+ P bot A P top A P bot = P top liq gh F liq =( P top liq gh ) A P top A F liq liq gh A liq gV = m liq g
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Examples Floating Ship Floating Weights Newton's 3 rd Law Buoyancy Paradox Only Partially submerged Buoyant force due to air
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Ideal Fluid Assumptions: Density is constant Fluid velocity is independent of time (not of position) No friction (no viscosity) No complex flow patterns (turbulence) Principle of continuity: The amount of fluid that flows
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2011 for the course PHYS 220 taught by Professor Chang during the Fall '09 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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Lecture_16 - Buoyancy & Fluid Dynamics Buoyancy...

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