Lecture23_Kim

Lecture23_Kim - Review: Derivation of Snells Law for...

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Lecture 23-1 Review: Derivation of Snell’s Law for Refraction from Huygens’s Principle 11  22 21 sin sin v t v t AB   sin sin v v  / v c n index of refraction medium n vacuum 1 air 1.0003 water 1.33 glass 1.5 – 1.66 12 sin sin n n Snell’s Law 2 2 sin vt AB  1 1 sin
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Lecture 23-2 Polarization (1) This type of wave is called a plane-polarized wave in the y direction Consider the electromagnetic wave shown The electric field for this electromagnetic wave always points along the y -axis We represent the electric field oscillating in the the y-z plane as the polarization vector as in the picture
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Lecture 23-3 Polarization (2) Each wave has its electric field vector oscillating in a different plane This light is called unpolarized light We represent the polarization of the light from an unpolarized source by drawing many waves like the one shown below but with random orientations The electromagnetic waves making up the light emitted by most common light sources such as an incandescent light bulb have random polarizations
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Lecture 23-4 Polarization (3) We can represent light with many polarizations by summing the y components and summing the z components to produce the net y and z components For unpolarized light, we obtain equal components in the y - and z -directions If there is less net polarization in the y direction than in the z direction, then we say that the light is partially polarized in the z direction
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Lecture 23-5 Polarization by Reflection   1 2 2 00 22 0 1 2 2 2 1 sin sin 90 180 90 sin sin 90 sin tan P o PP P P P P nn n n n n n   Brewster’s Law Definition of Brewster angle or polarizing angle P
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Lecture 23-6 Polarizer (1) We can change unpolarized light to polarized light by passing it through a polarizer A polarizer allows only one component of the polarization of the light to pass through One way to make a polarizer is to produce a material that consists of long parallel chains of molecules that effectively only let light
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Lecture23_Kim - Review: Derivation of Snells Law for...

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