Organic chem

Organic chem - Carbon and Organic Chemistry David A Katz...

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Carbon and Organic Chemistry avid A Katz David A. Katz Department of Chemistry Pima Community College
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Carbon Allotropic forms Coal Amorphous – no definite crystal structure Bituminous Coal: Great pressure results in the creation of bituminous, or “soft” coal. This is the type most commonly used for Anthracite: Sometimes also called “hard coal”. Formed from bituminous coal when great pressures developed in folded electric power generation in the U.S. It has a lower heating value than anthracite . rock strata during the creation of mountain ranges. Anthracite has the highest energy content of all coals.
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The Pioneer Coal Mine Ashland, PA
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Miner’s carbide lamp and safety lamps Davy’s safety lamp, 1815
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raphite Graphite Graphite consists of yers of carbon atoms layers of carbon atoms in a hexagonal arrangement. There are nly weak bonds only weak bonds between layers, allowing the layers to slide over one another. Graphite is used in the “lead” of lead encils, as a dry pe c s, as a d y lubricant, and in electroplating of ubstances substances .
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Diamond Diamond has a framework structure where each carbon atom is bonded to 4 other carbons in a three-dimensional structure. iamond is the hardest naturally Diamond is the hardest naturally occurring mineral found in nature. Used for drills, cutting wheels, and polishing of many substances, as well as for jewelery.
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Buckminsterfullerene Buckminsterfullerene, consisting of 60 carbon atoms in a spherical shape similar to a soccer ball, is formed electrically evaporating graphite in an atmosphere of He gas. Note that the structure consists of both 5 and 6 member carbon rings. Because the shape is similar to that of a geodesic dome invented by R. Buckminster Fuller, it was named buckminsterfullerene or “Bucky Ball” for short. Fullerenes have been prepared with as few as 20 carbon atoms and more than 80 atoms. Applications include superconductors, along with compounds with interesting electrical, magnetic, and optical properties.
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Carbon Nanotubes iscovered 952 nd gain oted ubsequent ears, ey ere Discovered in 1952, and again noted in subsequent years, they were overlooked until about 1991. Carbon nanotubes are essentially a sheet of graphite rolled into a seamless tube approximately 1 nm in diameter. They have very high strength and high electrical and heat conductivity. (Multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been synthesized.) Uses include wires or structural elements, special conductors, transistors, computer memory elements, nanoscale motors, and edical elivery ystems medical delivery systems.
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Graphene Graphene is a single planar sheet of carbon atoms that are densely packed in a honeycomb crystal ttice Graphene is the basic structural element for lattice. Graphene is the basic structural element for all other graphitic materials including graphite, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes.
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This note was uploaded on 12/07/2011 for the course CHEM 152 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Pima CC.

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Organic chem - Carbon and Organic Chemistry David A Katz...

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