Solutions 2010

Solutions 2010 - Solutions Solutions David A. Katz...

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olutions Solutions David A. Katz Department of Chemistry Pima Community College
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olution is a A A solution is a solution is a HOMOGENEOUS mixture of 2 or more substances in single phase One constituent is usually regarded as the SOLVENT (usually water) and the others a single phase. as SOLUTES .
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olutions Solutions In a solution, the solute is dispersed niformly throughout the olvent uniformly throughout the solvent .
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olutions: Solutions: Gases mixed ith gases with gases
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Solutions: Gas mixed with liquid
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olutions: Solutions: Liquid mixed ith liquid with liquid
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olutions: Solutions: Solid mixed ith liquid with liquid
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Solutions: as mixed Gas mixed with solid hotomicrographs Photomicrographs of Hydrogen on palladium
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Solutions: iquid mixed Liquid mixed with solid (a mercury amalgam with gold)
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Solutions: Solid mixed with solid (alloys) Brass: a substitution alloy Carbon steel: an interstitial alloy
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Intermolecular Forces Why does a substance dissolve? The intermolecular forces between solute and solvent particles must be strong enough compete with those to compete with those between solute articles and those particles and those between solvent particles.
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Intermolecular stronger Forces: Why does a substance dissolve? he intermolecular The intermolecular forces between solute and solvent particles must be strong enough to compete with those between solute particles and those between solvent articles particles. (continued on next slide) weaker
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stronger Intermolecular orces: Forces: Why does a ubstance dissolve? substance dissolve? (continued) weaker
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ow Does a Solution Form? How Does a Solution Form? In this example, we have an ionic solid, NaCl, and polar solvent, H . a polar solvent, H 2 O. The solution forms because the solvent pulls solute particles apart and surrounds, or solvates , them. In water this is called hydration . Solute (NaCl) in water The solute is dissolving Hydrated ions in solution
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ow Does a Solution Form How Does a Solution Form If an ionic salt is soluble in water, it is because the ion- dipole interactions are trong enough to overcome strong enough to overcome the lattice energy of the salt crystal. The ions are hydrated – that revents the ions from prevents the ions from reforming the crystal lattice under normal conditions.
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Solutions Just because a substance disappears when it comes in contact with a solvent , it doesn’t mean the ubstance dissolved substance dissolved. Dissolution is a physical change — you can get back the original solute by evaporating the solvent. If you can’t, the substance didn’t dissolve, it reacted .
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Water as a Solvent ow water dissolves molecular How water dissolves molecular compounds: hen the onpolar art of an organic When the nonpolar part of an organic molecule is considerably larger than the polar part, the molecule no longer pp , g dissolves in water.
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Solutions 2010 - Solutions Solutions David A. Katz...

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