Exam1_2010 - Determine the pres-sure difference between the blood in the aneurysm and that in the artery Assume the flow is steady and inviscid(Use

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57:020 Mechanics of Fluids and Transport Fall 2010 EXAM1 October 4, 2010 1. A layer of water flows down an inclined fixed surface with the velocity profile shown in Fig. 1. Determine the shearing stress that the water exerts on the fixed surface for ? = 2 m/s and = 0.1 m. (Use µ = 1.12 × 10 -3 N s/m 2 for water) 2. The dam in Fig. 2 is a quarter-circle 50 m wide into the paper. Determine the horizontal and ver- tical components of hydrostatic force against the dam and the angle of the resultant force from the vertical. (Use γ = 9790 N/m 3 for water) Fig. 1 Fig. 2 3. Blood (SG = 1) flows with a velocity of 0.5 m/s in an artery. It then enters an aneurysm in the ar- tery (i.e., an area of weakened and stretched artery walls that cause a ballooning of the vessel as shown in Fig. 3) whose cross-sectional area is 1.8 times that of the artery.
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Unformatted text preview: Determine the pres-sure difference between the blood in the aneurysm and that in the artery. Assume the flow is steady and inviscid. (Use ρ water = 999 Kg/m 3 ) 4. The velocity components for steady flow through the nozzle shown in Fig. 4 are ± = − ² ³ ℓ ⁄ and ´ = ² [1 + ( µ ℓ ⁄ )] , where ² and ℓ are constants. Determine the pressure gradient along the y-axis at point (2) when the fluid is water with ² = 1 m s ⁄ and ℓ = 0.1 m . Neglect viscous effects and use the Euler quation ∇¶ = −· ¸ − ¹ º , where gradient ∇ = » »³ ¼̂ + » »µ ½̂ , ¸ = ¸ ³ ¼̂ + ¸ µ ½̂ is the flow acceleration, and ¹ = −¹½̂ is the gravity. (Use = 999 Kg/m 3 for water) Fig. 3 Fig. 4...
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This note was uploaded on 12/08/2011 for the course MECHANICS 57:020 taught by Professor Fredrickstern during the Fall '10 term at University of Iowa.

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