AMaheshwari_BUS540-LH_Module02_06-04-2011

AMaheshwari_BUS540-LH_Module02_06-04-2011 - Module21...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Module 2      1 Module 2
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Module 2      2 Abstract Response to the first question talks about the law of demand, elasticity of demand and  the relationship between price and revenue where when the demand is inelastic and  price is increased, total revenue also increases. Response to the second question  defines economies of scale, scope, learning effects and the differences between them.  Economies of scale refer to the notion of increasing efficiencies of the production of  goods as the number of goods being produced increases, economies of scope exist  when it is cheaper to produce two products together  than to produce them separately.  Response to third question lists 4 basic conditions characterizing a competitive market  such as many buyers and sellers, product homogeneity, free enter and exit and every  firm has a small market share. Response to the fourth question gives the differences  between personalized pricing and menu pricing showing that personalized pricing is  more profitable.                               .
Background image of page 2
Module 2      3 Module 2 Deliverables Assignments:  Questions Question:   If the demand for a product is inelastic, what will happen to total  revenue if price is increased? Response : If the demand for a product is inelastic and the price is increased, the total  revenue will increase. When demand is inelastic, a given percentage increase in price  corresponds   to   a   smaller   percentage   decrease   in   quantity   demanded.   Thus   total  revenue, which is equal to price times quantity, must increase. Prof. Samuelson (n.d.) writes that   The law of demand states that people will buy more at lower prices and buy less at  higher prices, other things remaining the same ( Nadar, Managerial Economics, PP  62 ) Similarly, E. Miller (n.d.) writes that  Other things remaining the same, the quantity demanded of a commodity will be  smaller at higher market prices and larger at lower market prices. Other things  remaining the same, the quantity demanded increases with every fall in the price  and decreases with every rise in the price ( Economics concepts, Law of Demand
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Module 2      4   http://www.economicsconcepts.com/law_of_demand.htm ) In simple way, we can say that when the price of a commodity rises, people buy less of  that commodity and when the price falls, people buy more of it ceteris paribus (other  things remaining the same). Or we can say that the quantity varies inversely with its  price. There is no doubt that demand responds to price in the reverse direction but it has  got no uniform relation between them. If the price of a commodity falls by 1%, it is not 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/08/2011 for the course MBA 520,510,59 taught by Professor Kate during the Spring '11 term at Asian Institute of Management.

Page1 / 17

AMaheshwari_BUS540-LH_Module02_06-04-2011 - Module21...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online