Geothermal Application - The term Geothermal originates...

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The term Geothermal originates from two Geek words 'GEO' and 'THERM'. The Greek word ‘geo’ meant the earth whilst their word for ‘therm’ meant heat from the earth.
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Geothermal energy is energy derived from the heat of the earth. The earth’s centre is a distance of approximately 4000 miles and is so hot that it is molten. Temperatures are understood to be at least 5000 degrees centigrade. Heat from the centre of the earth conducts outwards and heats up the outer layers of rock called the mantle. When this type of rock melts and becomes molten it is called magma. Magma can reach just below the earth’s surface. Rain water sometimes seeps down through geological fault lines and cracks becoming super heated by the hot rocks below. Some of this super heated water rises back to the surface of the earth where it emerges as hot springs or even geysers. Sometimes the hot water becomes trapped below the surface as a geothermal reservoir.
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One way of producing electricity from geothermal energy is by drilling wells into the geothermal reservoirs. The hot water that rises emerges at the surface as steam. The steam is used to drive turbines producing electricity. If the water is not hot enough to produce steam, it can still be used to heat homes and businesses, saving
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DRY STEAM POWER PLANT Dry Steam Plants produce electricity directly from the steam that emerges at the earths surface. The steam drives turbines.
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BINARY CYCLE POWER PLANT If the water that reaches the surface is not hot enough to produce steam, it can still be used to produce electricity by feeding it into a Binary Power Plant. The hot water is fed into a heat exchanger. The heat from the water is absorbed by a liquid such as isopentane which boils at a lower temperature. The isopentane steam is used to drive turbines, producing electricity. The isopentane then condenses back to its liquid state and is used again.
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Geothermal Application - The term Geothermal originates...

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