Lesson_078_Colligative_Properties

Lesson_078_Colligative_Properties - Evan P. Silberstein,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
© Evan P. Silberstein, 2008
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
WRITE DOWN
Background image of page 2
Colligative properties are not affected by the properties of the solute, but,rather, only by the number of particles. Electrolytes dissociate producing more particles per mole than nonelectrolytes. o Therefore electrolytes produce larger colligative affects than nonelectrolytes. NaCl ( s ) → Na + ( aq ) + Cl ( aq ) 1 mol ( s ) → 2 mol ( aq ) WRITE DOWN
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The presence of dissolved solute lowers the freezing point of a solvent. Examples: o Putting salt on an icy sidewalk or roadway causes the ice to melt. o Antifreeze keeps the auto radiator from freezing. WRITE DOWN
Background image of page 4
Water freezing When water freezes, positive hydrogens line up with negative oxygens. Water freezing with solute Solute interferes with crystallization, lowering the freezing point. Na + (blue) is attracted to oxygen. Cl is attracted to hydrogen.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The presence of nonvolatile dissolved solute raises the boiling point of a more volatile solvent. o
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/09/2011 for the course CS 561/661 taught by Professor Lubke during the Summer '11 term at Virginia Tech.

Page1 / 10

Lesson_078_Colligative_Properties - Evan P. Silberstein,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online