{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

A student then -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
"A student then, or formerly a student," cried the clerk. "Just what I thought! I'm a man of experience,  immense experience, sir," and he tapped his forehead with his fingers in self-approval. "You've been  a student or have attended some learned institution! . . . But allow me . . . ." He got up, staggered,  took up his jug and glass, and sat down beside the young man, facing him a little sideways. He was  drunk, but spoke fluently and boldly, only occasionally losing the thread of his sentences and  drawling his words. He pounced upon Raskolnikov as greedily as though he too had not spoken to a  soul for a month. "Honoured sir," he began almost with solemnity, "poverty is not a vice, that's a true saying. Yet I know  too that drunkenness is not a virtue, and that that's even truer. But beggary, honoured sir, beggary is  a vice. In poverty you may still retain your innate nobility of soul, but in beggary — never — no one. 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}